May 25th, 2018

Meenakshi Ponnuswami, (English) “British Asian Women in Performance: Stage, Screen, and Stand-Up,” – March 2018

This talk will focus on British Asian women’s performance arts, including theatre, film, and stand-up comedy. She will discuss works like Bend It Like Beckham and Bhaji on the Beach, and stand-up comedy by Shazia Mirza.

Continue reading Meenakshi Ponnuswami, (English) “British Asian Women in Performance: Stage, Screen, and Stand-Up,” – March 2018 »

May 25th, 2018

Katherine Faull (German & Comparative Humanities), “Race, Religion, and Iron: A Case of Knowledge Transfer between West Africa and the Colonial Mid-Atlantic States?”

What is the connection between the Colonial iron industry, enslaved peoples of African descent, and the spread of religion in the NJ, PA, NY area in the mid-18th century?  Archival research and digital mapping point towards an answer.

Continue reading Katherine Faull (German & Comparative Humanities), “Race, Religion, and Iron: A Case of Knowledge Transfer between West Africa and the Colonial Mid-Atlantic States?” »

May 25th, 2018

Vanessa Massaro: “Externalizing the “Inmate”: Tracing the Intimate Economies of the New Geographies of Correctional Supervision”- February 2018

This talk explores the emerging terrains of the prison industrial complex that subversively continue to expand supervision while purporting to reduce prison populations.

Continue reading Vanessa Massaro: “Externalizing the “Inmate”: Tracing the Intimate Economies of the New Geographies of Correctional Supervision”- February 2018 »

May 25th, 2018

Elizabeth Armstrong – Sociology/Organizational Studies, University of Michigan

Drawing on findings from a five-year interview study, Elizabeth Armstrong and Laura Hamilton bring us to the campus of “MU,” a flagship Midwestern public university, where we follow a group of women drawn into a culture of status seeking and sororities.

Continue reading Elizabeth Armstrong – Sociology/Organizational Studies, University of Michigan »

October 12th, 2017

Sue Ellen Henry & Abe Feuerstein: “The Hidden Language of Social Class: How Teachers Read Students’ Bodies ” – October 17, 2017

Social class is an embedded feature of social life; rather than being isolated and self-contained, social class positions are highly interdependent on one another. For first generation college students at Bucknell, most of whom are from working class backgrounds, university life is an exercise in enormous social class diversity, often for the first time. How does the experience of becoming a member of Bucknell influence these students’ social class identity? The present study probed this question deeply with three first generation college students, with particular emphasis on how working in service learning situations that mirrored their home environments shaped their […]

Continue reading Sue Ellen Henry & Abe Feuerstein: “The Hidden Language of Social Class: How Teachers Read Students’ Bodies ” – October 17, 2017 »

October 12th, 2017

Karyn Lacy: “Jeopardy or Just Fine?: Black Middle-Class Occupational Attainment in the Post-Civil Rights Era” – September 27, 2017

Will today’s black middle class reproduce itself? Through analysis of major trends in the composition of occupations by race, class, and gender over the past 40 years, this paper assesses the growth of the black middle class in two ways: 1.) over time and 2.) in comparison to progress made by other racial and ethnic groups in the United  States. The findings suggest there are good reasons to be optimistic about the future of the black middle class, but also point to persistent disparities that impede the group’s economic success.

Continue reading Karyn Lacy: “Jeopardy or Just Fine?: Black Middle-Class Occupational Attainment in the Post-Civil Rights Era” – September 27, 2017 »

October 12th, 2017

Coralynn Davis: “Women’s Traditional Storytelling and Contemporary Painting in Mithila: Intergenerational and Cross-genre Conversations” – September 12, 2017

Professor Davis examines the interfaces among women’s evolving expressive arts, young women’s empowerment, and cultural preservation in Mithila, a cultural and linguistic region on the border between Nepal’s eastern terai and the adjacent region of the state of Bihar in India. She reflects on her current collaborative research project, which involves co-production of a participatory documentary film as well as the creation of a digital archive of women’s tales.

Continue reading Coralynn Davis: “Women’s Traditional Storytelling and Contemporary Painting in Mithila: Intergenerational and Cross-genre Conversations” – September 12, 2017 »

March 23rd, 2017

Scott St. Pierre: “Cuck: Meninists, Aardvarks, and Other Peculiarities in 21st Century Anti-Feminist Discourse” – March 23, 2017

This talk analyzes 21st century representations of anti-feminist discourse.   I argue that such discourse among men in our current moment takes an even more radicalized and potentially toxic form under the sign of anti-African American racism and anti-queer expression.  I examine representations of anti-feminist speech and text as a way of locating a juncture between the recent explosion of online anti-feminist speech and its connections to alt-right racist hate speech as metaphorized and embodied in the anti-queer and anti-black figure of the “cuck.”  In doing so, I explore symptoms of toxic, wounded white masculinity that strike out at feminism via […]

Continue reading Scott St. Pierre: “Cuck: Meninists, Aardvarks, and Other Peculiarities in 21st Century Anti-Feminist Discourse” – March 23, 2017 »

March 7th, 2017

Mai-Linh Hong: “Resettling America: Refugee Law and Refugee Narratives.” – March 8, 2017

Popular narratives about refugees usually feature a racial or national Other granted a “new beginning” by humanitarian-minded Americans. Such sentimental stories divert attention from global conditions of insecurity and inequality that produce refugee crises, including overseas U.S. military action. Contemporary Vietnamese American literature reminds us of America’s role in creating refugees, and offers lessons about refugee law and policy for the Trump era.

Continue reading Mai-Linh Hong: “Resettling America: Refugee Law and Refugee Narratives.” – March 8, 2017 »

March 23rd, 2017

Wilton Martinez: “Transnational Fiesta: Twenty Years Later” – March 2, 2017

Transnational Fiesta: Twenty Years Later explores cultural change and continuity in the indigenous Andean community, fiesta, and migrant colony first documented in the award-winning Transnational Fiesta: 1992. The film follows a migrant family as they travel to celebrate the patron saint fiesta they first sponsored two decades earlier in their hometown, Cabanaconde, Peru, and also participate in the diaspora fiesta in Maryland. The sequel shows the remarkable persistence of Andean culture over time and space as well as the ruptures imposed by global capitalism, generational differences, and other forces of change. For more information see: transnationalfiesta.com

Continue reading Wilton Martinez: “Transnational Fiesta: Twenty Years Later” – March 2, 2017 »

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