April 25th, 2017

Anushikha Sharma ’18 & Mona Mohammed ‘16: “The B.A.D Feminist” – April 25, 2017

Who is a B.A.D. feminist? How does an activist endeavor encompass feminist values? Is feminism an ideal to reach for, or a framework to guide our practice? Anushikha and Mona, from the Bucknell Alternative Delegation, will be analyzing the group’s organization and action from their feminist lens. B.A.D. did not start as a consciously feminist group, but in many ways is advocating for the dismantling of the status quo that empowers the cis-hetero-white-supremacist-capitalist-patriarchy to function on Bucknell’s campus.Come to hear about some of the successes achieved and challenges faced by the group, and learn more about what happens when B.A.D. […]

Continue reading Anushikha Sharma ’18 & Mona Mohammed ‘16: “The B.A.D Feminist” – April 25, 2017 »

April 25th, 2017

Tamara Hijazi ’17: “Queering the Body: the Construction, Colonization, and Fragmentation of the Body in the Arab Islamicate World” – April 20, 2017

The manner in which Islam and national culture have intersected through time and space is often disregarded when it comes to a feminist analysis of the Middle East, particularly Arab feminism. The dissection of the veil is a common basis for Western feminist theory analyzing the Arab world; the veil is constantly dissected as a form of empowerment (versus of oppression), of seclusion (versus of protection), of a component of imposed public politics (versus personal politics). It is the often what theorists look at when they seek to analyze queerness in the Arab Islamicate world – but I want to […]

Continue reading Tamara Hijazi ’17: “Queering the Body: the Construction, Colonization, and Fragmentation of the Body in the Arab Islamicate World” – April 20, 2017 »

April 25th, 2017

Ines Malone ’19: “On the Field, in the Stands, and on the Page: Enacting Masculinity in Spain’s Soccer Stadiums” – April 18, 2017

We begin with the premise that fútbol is more than just a game: it is a proving ground for Spanish masculinity; it denotes political preferences; it is proxy warfare with nationalistic undertones; it is barely-concealed ethnic bias, sexism, homophobia. Using spatial geography and a closer look at the Spanish graphic novel Fútbol by Pablo Ríos and Santiago García and the international anti-homophobia Rainbow Laces campaign, we make a tentative first step in understanding how a country like Spain, among the first of the European Union to legalize gay marriage, combats the stadium as a microcosm of regression. We suggest that […]

Continue reading Ines Malone ’19: “On the Field, in the Stands, and on the Page: Enacting Masculinity in Spain’s Soccer Stadiums” – April 18, 2017 »

April 27th, 2017

Cynthia Willet: “On Humor: Feminist Makeovers from Sluts and Other Social Misfits” – April 5, 2017

Despite the perception that feminists lack a sense of humor, and that women along with other social misfits are the natural targets of laughter, women have long used comic tactics to subvert conventional norms.  This talk explores how the very concept of the comic alters once its natural targets become laughter’s central agents rather than its humiliated victims.

Continue reading Cynthia Willet: “On Humor: Feminist Makeovers from Sluts and Other Social Misfits” – April 5, 2017 »

March 23rd, 2017

Scott St. Pierre: “Cuck: Meninists, Aardvarks, and Other Peculiarities in 21st Century Anti-Feminist Discourse” – March 23, 2017

This talk analyzes 21st century representations of anti-feminist discourse.   I argue that such discourse among men in our current moment takes an even more radicalized and potentially toxic form under the sign of anti-African American racism and anti-queer expression.  I examine representations of anti-feminist speech and text as a way of locating a juncture between the recent explosion of online anti-feminist speech and its connections to alt-right racist hate speech as metaphorized and embodied in the anti-queer and anti-black figure of the “cuck.”  In doing so, I explore symptoms of toxic, wounded white masculinity that strike out at feminism via […]

Continue reading Scott St. Pierre: “Cuck: Meninists, Aardvarks, and Other Peculiarities in 21st Century Anti-Feminist Discourse” – March 23, 2017 »

March 7th, 2017

Mai-Linh Hong: “Resettling America: Refugee Law and Refugee Narratives.” – March 8, 2017

Popular narratives about refugees usually feature a racial or national Other granted a “new beginning” by humanitarian-minded Americans. Such sentimental stories divert attention from global conditions of insecurity and inequality that produce refugee crises, including overseas U.S. military action. Contemporary Vietnamese American literature reminds us of America’s role in creating refugees, and offers lessons about refugee law and policy for the Trump era.

Continue reading Mai-Linh Hong: “Resettling America: Refugee Law and Refugee Narratives.” – March 8, 2017 »

March 23rd, 2017

Wilton Martinez: “Transnational Fiesta: Twenty Years Later” – March 2, 2017

Transnational Fiesta: Twenty Years Later explores cultural change and continuity in the indigenous Andean community, fiesta, and migrant colony first documented in the award-winning Transnational Fiesta: 1992. The film follows a migrant family as they travel to celebrate the patron saint fiesta they first sponsored two decades earlier in their hometown, Cabanaconde, Peru, and also participate in the diaspora fiesta in Maryland. The sequel shows the remarkable persistence of Andean culture over time and space as well as the ruptures imposed by global capitalism, generational differences, and other forces of change. For more information see: transnationalfiesta.com

Continue reading Wilton Martinez: “Transnational Fiesta: Twenty Years Later” – March 2, 2017 »

March 23rd, 2017

Wilton Martinez Colloquium: “No final solutions: current trends in ethnographic film” – March 2, 2017

In the “age of the image,” when convergence culture and the imperium of visualism have voided social life, bodies, and experiences from reference to the real, when designer images perform their own presence above and apart from the phenomenal world, what is the place for visual anthropology and ethnographic film, disciplines born together with film technology and guided by the goal of studying and using images to explore human nature? In this presentation I trace the tropological development of ethnographic film and discuss current trends that purport to solve the conundrum by either embracing designer images or searching for the […]

Continue reading Wilton Martinez Colloquium: “No final solutions: current trends in ethnographic film” – March 2, 2017 »

February 28th, 2017

Robyn Henderson-Espinoza: New Folds of Borderlands: Tracing the Figure of the Nomad thru Difference & Becoming – February 15, 2017

Borderlands surround us, as Gloria Anzaldúa writes.  They are psychic, spiritual, physical, sexual, national, and so many more. The proliferation of Borderlands have created the figure of the Nomad, the content moving between the here and now.  What borderlands offer us is an opportunity to analyze difference and becoming from the interstitial space of becoming.  Difference, in relationship with becoming, elucidates nomadic movement and thus helps to create the figure of the nomad.  In conversation with Deleuze and Anzaldúa, this lecture seeks to trace the figure of the nomad thru difference and becoming.

Continue reading Robyn Henderson-Espinoza: New Folds of Borderlands: Tracing the Figure of the Nomad thru Difference & Becoming – February 15, 2017 »

March 7th, 2017

Anthony Stewart: “A Visitor Thinks About ‘Home'” – December 1, 2016

My work on my life in Canada has been an opportunity to think about the stories we tell ourselves, both myself, and the different reactions that my work about race in Canada has governed. My new work considers what “home” means to someone who no longer lives in the country in which he was born. This expatriate situation destabilizes my notion of home, and I have started thinking about how this destabilization is production in terms of understanding not just my notion of home, but those notions other people hold, too.

Continue reading Anthony Stewart: “A Visitor Thinks About ‘Home'” – December 1, 2016 »

Close

Places I've Been

The following links are virtual breadcrumbs marking the 12 most recent pages you have visited in Bucknell.edu. If you want to remember a specific page forever click the pin in the top right corner and we will be sure not to replace it. Close this message.