November 7th, 2018

Michelle Harris: “Contemporary Indigeneity and the Politics of Being” – October 17, 2018

Michelle Harris is the director of the Institute for Global Indigeneity and a professor in the Department of Africana Studies at The University at Albany, SUNY. She is the covener of Working Group on Emergent Indigenous Identities and a co-editor and contributor to the volume, The Politics of Identity: Emergent Indigeneity (2013). Her scholarship explores indigennous identity construction and expression and the Internationalization of the Indigenous Studies.

Continue reading Michelle Harris: “Contemporary Indigeneity and the Politics of Being” – October 17, 2018 »

November 7th, 2018

“RUMBLE: The Indians Who Rocked the World” – October 2, 2018

Film introduced by Obed Lira (Spanish) and Cymone Fourshey (History and International Relations). The Center for Race, Ethnicity & Gender will present a screening of the film Rumble: The Indians Who Rocked the World. The showing is sponsored by the Bucknell Film/Media Studies Program as part of the Tuesday Film Series. Rumble: The Indians Who Rocked the World is a 2017 documentary about the role of Native Americans in popular music history.

Continue reading “RUMBLE: The Indians Who Rocked the World” – October 2, 2018 »

Continue reading Kyle T. Mays – “We Still Here: Indigenous Hip Hop, Resisting (settler) Colonialism, and the Politics of Possibility” – September 25, 2018 »

November 7th, 2018

Dorothy Allison – “A Racecar Named Desire: Stories of Class, Race, Sexuality and Gender” – April 17, 2018

Story shapes our world—the stories we have been told, the stories we read or watch or imagine—the ‘what if’ narratives, the ‘I could not stand it if they did that’ prayers, and most important of all—this is why I am the way I am stories. Examining the stories we love or hate or need to believe can tell us a great deal about the way the world works, and how it might be changed. In this lecture, Dorothy Allison will address the significance of story in relationship to themes of class, race, sexuality and gender.

Continue reading Dorothy Allison – “A Racecar Named Desire: Stories of Class, Race, Sexuality and Gender” – April 17, 2018 »

May 25th, 2018

Elizabeth Armstrong – Sociology/Organizational Studies, University of Michigan – March 27, 2018

Drawing on findings from a five-year interview study, Elizabeth Armstrong and Laura Hamilton bring us to the campus of “MU,” a flagship Midwestern public university, where we follow a group of women drawn into a culture of status seeking and sororities.

Continue reading Elizabeth Armstrong – Sociology/Organizational Studies, University of Michigan – March 27, 2018 »

May 25th, 2018

Meenakshi Ponnuswami, (English) “British Asian Women in Performance: Stage, Screen, and Stand-Up,” – March 2018

This talk will focus on British Asian women’s performance arts, including theatre, film, and stand-up comedy. She will discuss works like Bend It Like Beckham and Bhaji on the Beach, and stand-up comedy by Shazia Mirza.

Continue reading Meenakshi Ponnuswami, (English) “British Asian Women in Performance: Stage, Screen, and Stand-Up,” – March 2018 »

May 25th, 2018

Vanessa Massaro: “Externalizing the “Inmate”: Tracing the Intimate Economies of the New Geographies of Correctional Supervision”- February 2018

This talk explores the emerging terrains of the prison industrial complex that subversively continue to expand supervision while purporting to reduce prison populations.

Continue reading Vanessa Massaro: “Externalizing the “Inmate”: Tracing the Intimate Economies of the New Geographies of Correctional Supervision”- February 2018 »

November 7th, 2018

Katherine Faull: “Race, Religion, and Iron: A Case of Knowledge Transfer between West Africa and the Colonial Mid-Atlantic States? – February 6, 2018

While recent scholarship has focused on knowledge transfer from African cultures to the Americas concerning inter alia rice production (see Sept 2016’s visiting PBK scholar, Judith Carney, Black Rice) there has to date been little work that traces the links between the production of iron in West Africa and the small Colonial iron forges of the mid-Atlantic region. This paper asks the question about the connection between labor practices in the nascent Colonial iron industry, enslaved peoples of African descent, and the reports of itinerant (Euro- and African-American) Moravian preachers in the NJ, PA, NY area in the mid-18th century. […]

Continue reading Katherine Faull: “Race, Religion, and Iron: A Case of Knowledge Transfer between West Africa and the Colonial Mid-Atlantic States? – February 6, 2018 »

October 12th, 2017

Sue Ellen Henry & Abe Feuerstein: “The Hidden Language of Social Class: How Teachers Read Students’ Bodies ” – October 17, 2017

Social class is an embedded feature of social life; rather than being isolated and self-contained, social class positions are highly interdependent on one another. For first generation college students at Bucknell, most of whom are from working class backgrounds, university life is an exercise in enormous social class diversity, often for the first time. How does the experience of becoming a member of Bucknell influence these students’ social class identity? The present study probed this question deeply with three first generation college students, with particular emphasis on how working in service learning situations that mirrored their home environments shaped their […]

Continue reading Sue Ellen Henry & Abe Feuerstein: “The Hidden Language of Social Class: How Teachers Read Students’ Bodies ” – October 17, 2017 »

October 12th, 2017

Karyn Lacy: “Jeopardy or Just Fine?: Black Middle-Class Occupational Attainment in the Post-Civil Rights Era” – September 27, 2017

Will today’s black middle class reproduce itself? Through analysis of major trends in the composition of occupations by race, class, and gender over the past 40 years, this paper assesses the growth of the black middle class in two ways: 1.) over time and 2.) in comparison to progress made by other racial and ethnic groups in the United  States. The findings suggest there are good reasons to be optimistic about the future of the black middle class, but also point to persistent disparities that impede the group’s economic success.

Continue reading Karyn Lacy: “Jeopardy or Just Fine?: Black Middle-Class Occupational Attainment in the Post-Civil Rights Era” – September 27, 2017 »

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